Chrysaor boar FINAL LOGO

EnergySys Welcome Chrysaor to Their Expanding Clientbase

EnergySys Ltd is delighted to announce that Chrysaor has joined the rapidly growing number of oil and gas companies who use the innovative EnergySys Cloud Platform to manage their production data.  

The contract was executed in July 2017, and will see Chrysaor use EnergySys to deliver hydrocarbon accounting and production reporting for the North Sea assets they recently acquired from Shell. They are predicted to go live for September 2017.  

Details
dusup

Dubai Supply Authority Select EnergySys

EnergySys Ltd is delighted to welcome the Dubai Supply Authority (DUSUP) to the growing number of oil and gas companies using the market-leading EnergySys platform.

 

The contract was executed in January 2017 and will see DUSUP use the platform to manage their gas pipeline operations data.

Details

How we can fix standards efforts in oil and gas

I’ve spoken at several conferences about the failures in standards efforts in oil and gas, and I’ve commented on the reasons for these failures. I’ve also highlighted the key characteristics of successful standards efforts in other industries. In the short version, this boils down to my well-worn aphorism “adoption beats perfection”. The longer version is contained in the seminal paper by Hanseth and Lyytinen (“Theorizing about the Design of Information Infrastructures: Design Kernel Theories and Principles”, 2004) which, despite its title, contains material that is relevant for all standards efforts. They identify five design principles:

  1. Design initially for usefulness
  2. Draw upon existing installed base
  3. Expand installed base by persuasive tactics to gain momentum
  4. Make it simple
  5. Modularize by building separately key functions of each infrastructure, use layering, and gateways

A cursory glance at the standards documentation from bodies like Energistics and PPDM demonstrate a failure to adhere to some, if not all, of these principles.

This has led me to consider the goals of standardisation in oil and gas, and what might help with their adoption.

I can see three obvious scenarios where standards could be useful. There are probably more, but let’s start with these three.

Details

The costs of unreliable data

In a recent survey we carried out, (download the report here), we asked professionals involved in Hydrocarbon Accounting (HCA) how confident they were in their data. Around 65% said that they were “not at all” or only “somewhat” confident in the data they were using as input to the hydrocarbon allocation process. This situation is problematic, given that allocation is all about determining the division of ownership of hydrocarbon products, and that mistakes can have a real and substantial financial impact. Inadequate systems and processes can make it difficult to manage routine issues like mismeasurements, and initially small problems can give rise to a cascade effect with consequences that are difficult to unravel. A failure of compliance is not the least of the potential problems.

Details

Reducing the costs of IT in oil and gas

The ways that oil and gas companies address IT, outside core disciplines such as geology and geophysics, are marked by an unrelenting enthusiasm for cost cutting. However, it’s often the case that the methods employed, including outsourcing or offshoring, end up forcing a difficult choice between quality of service and cost. In the short term it’s easy to cut costs, but when you discover the things that don’t work because they’re outside scope or ill-defined, and the costs of putting them right, some options can be less appealing.

Details